You are here

Calendar

IRTF Events Calendar

July 18, 2020 to September 30, 2020: Urgent Action: Demand a Search for Disappeared Garífuna Leaders in Honduras!
all day

 

Urgent Action: Demand the Return of the 4 Forcibly Disappeared Garifuna Men in Honduras

In this posting:

A- Take Action to demand a search for the five Garífuna men who were forcibly disappeared on July 18, 2020

B- Background on the Garífuna community of Triunfo de la Cruz, Honduras

C- Calls from the US, Europe, and the Inter-American Court of Human Rights demanding a search for the Garífuna men

D- More articles and analysis

E- Sample letter you can send to your US representative and US senators

F- More info: contact OFRANEH and Honduras Solidarity Network

A- Take Action to demand a search 

On the morning of Saturday July 18, Garífuna leader Snider Centeno, together with four others from the Triunfo de la Cruz community, were forcedly disappeared by a group of men wearing Honduran Police (DPI) bullet proof vests.

Click here to TAKE ACTION now!

Contact Honduran officials, with copies to US and Canadian officials, demanding the return of the forcibly disappeared Garífuna leaders, an end to the terror campaign to displace the communities, and the compliance with rulings by the Inter-American Court of Human Rights in favor of the Garífuna in Honduras.

Stand with us in support of OFRANEH and the Garífuna communities in Honduras against the campaign by the Honduran regime and unscrupulous developers to displace the Garífuna people and turn their territories into mono-culture agriculture, tourist resorts and extractive projects.

We join the Garífuna communities in demanding:

-the return of the five disappeared men alive.
-a serious and impartial investigation that does not include the DPI (police) into the disappearance of the men from Triunfo de la Cruz.
- compliance with the orders of the Inter-American Human Rights Court for justice for Triunfo de la Cruz and Punta Piedra.
- an end to all attempts to displace Garifuna communities and all the violence and harassment against communities and organizations

The kidnapping and disappearance of these men is another attack against the Garífuna community and their struggle to protect their ancestral lands, and the rights of Afro-Indigenous and Indigenous people to live.

1- Click here to send your urgent message to these officials:

    Lidia Estela Cardona Padilla, Procuradora General de Honduras

    Ebal Díaz, Secretario de Estado en el Despacho de la Presidencia de Honduras

    Karla Cueva, Secretaría de Derechos Humanos

    Collen Hoey, Chargé d’Affaires, US Embassy in Tegucigalpa

    James K. Hill, Ambassador, Embassy of Canada to Costa Rica, Honduras, and Nicaragua

2- Send your own letter. See a sample below

 

B. BACKGROUND

The community Triunfo de la Cruz is emblematic of the Garífuna people’s struggle to defend their territories against seizure by the government and both Honduran and international developers  as well as organized crime with ties to both. All of them seek to exploit the coastal resources and displace the Garífuna people. In 2015 the Inter-American Court of Human Rights  (IACHR) ruled in favor of Triunfo de la Cruz  and Punta Piedra communities against the Honduran government. The IACHR ordered the Honduran State to make reparations for the harm they committed against Garifuna communities, to return the stolen land, to end impunity for the crimes committed against these communities throughout the decades of the 80’s and 90’s. However, the government has ignored the court’s orders.  In fact, violence and attempts to displace the Garifuna people have intensified. In 2019 alone, at least 19 Garífuna were murdered. In June, 2020 Antonio Bernárdez, a leader in the community of Punta Piedra was assassinated. Now, five more people, 4 of them Garifuna leaders, have been disappeared.    

See IRTF’s Rapid Response Network letters:

Antonio Bernárdez: https://www.irtfcleveland.org/content/rrn/2020-07-24-000000

Disappeared Garífuna men: https://www.irtfcleveland.org/content/rrn/2020-07-20-000000

As pressure on the Honduran dictatorship over the forced disappearances has grown, a vicious smear campaign was launched against the disappeared men, and their communities and organization, using fake photo montages and social media to accuse the men of being  part of organized crime. This tactic has been used  time and time again by the Honduran narco government to cover up for the murders and disappearances of all the assassinated Garifuna activists, and to unjustly jail and harass community leaders. It is especially outrageous  given that the de facto President of Honduras, Juan Orlando Hernandez, has been named a co-conspirator by the New York prosecutors in the case of  his brother Tony who was convicted of narcotics trafficking; prosecutors are pursuing charges against many others in his government circles.

C- Calls from the US, Europe, and the Inter-American Court on Human Rights demanding a search for the Garífuna men who were forcibly disappeared on July 18, 2020.

Despite an abundance of international solidarity actions, the response of the Honduran government has been less than adequate and unacceptable.  So much so that the Inter-American Court on Human Rights issued a ruling against Honduras and demands immediate action. 

IRTF Rapid Response Network writes (July 20) to government officials demanding and immediate search. 

EU Parliamentarians condemn the Honduran government’s (July 24) persecution of Black, indigenous organizations. 

US House leaders write to Secretary of State Mike Pompeo (July 30) to “express our deep concern about the deterioration of human rights protections and the growing culture of impunity under the [Honduran] administration.”

Appearing before the US Senate Foreign Relations Committee (July 30), Secretary of State Pompeo is asked by Sen Merkely why the US maintains this “cozy” relationship with Honduras, despite the State Department’s own report about killings, torture, detention, and violence against indigenous Hondurans—not to mention that the current president is implicated as a co-conspirator in widespread drug trafficking, money laundering, and human rights abuses.

In a letter to the president of Honduras, Prime Minister Gonsalves of St. Vincent and the Grenadines (Aug 1), who is also president of the CARICOM community of Caribbean nations, says: “this is an international human rights issue...[and]…the lawless and criminal campaign against the Garífuna people, and their leaders, in Honduras must stop.”

The Inter-American  Court on Human Rights issues a ruling (Aug 7) requiring the Honduran government to take all necessary and adequate measures to determine the whereabouts of the five men disappeared on July 18 and adopt protection measures for the communities of Triunfo de la Cruz and Punta Piedra.  The court also issues a deadline of Aug 24 for these measures. 

 

D- More articles and analysis

In a Democracy Now! interview, “We Are in Danger Daily: Honduran Afro-Indigenous Garífuna Demand Return of Kidnapped Land Defenders,” (Aug 17) , Carla García, international relations coordinator at the Black Fraternal Organization of Honduras (OFANEH), describes how the five Garífuna men were kidnapped by heavily armed men wearing police uniforms, forcing them into three unmarked vehicles at gunpoint. This was the latest attack against the Garífuna community as they defend their territory from destructive projects fueled by foreign investors and the Honduran government.

In his article for The Daily Beast, “Minority Group Fears ‘Genocide’ in Trump-Backed Honduras,” (Aug 10) Jeremy Kryt tells how Honduras’ neoliberal policies—policies that cater to transnational corporations at the expense of local residents like the Garifuna—also foster or enable factors like displacement, mass poverty, and the presence of organized crime, all of which actually drive the wave of Honduran migrants headed north toward the U.S.

In an article published on the Radio Progreso website (Aug 10), the Jesuit-sponsored Reflection Research and Communication Team in Honduras concludes that the kidnapping of the Garífuna leaders [on July 18] and the vulnerability that surrounds the Triunfo de la Cruz Garifuna community “is the product of structural violence promoted by the State that is expressed in threats, death, cultural and territorial dispossession.”

In the America Magazine article “Indigenous men in Honduras are being abducted. Are the police to blame?” (Aug 5) journalist Jackie McVicar explains how racism and a history of violence against human rights and environmental defenders in Honduras make the Garífuna people a vulnerable target. Over the course of decades, large scale economic projects (e.g., tourism, palm oil plantations) have led to land grabs taking away their pristine Caribbean beaches and a loss of fertile farmland that the Garífuna people had used for subsistence farming.

In “Honduras: Five ‘Disappeare’ in Triunfo and the Expulsion of the Garifuna People, “ (July 27) OFRANEH (Black Fraternal Organization of Honduras) outlines several threats to the Garífuna communities of the Atlantic coast: 1- the government’s Model Cities (ZDEs) legislation that encourages land grabs of communal Garífuna territories; 2- the lack of prior consultation with communities before economic development projects are started (this is a violation of international law); 3- tourism industry; 4- industrial agriculture (palm oil), 5- climate change, 6- coastal erosion, 7- State violence as weapon of social control, 8- assassinations of community leaders, 9- exodus of young people , many fleeing to the US.

In her article in The Guardian, “Fears growing for five indigenous Garifuna men abducted in Honduras,” (July 23) journalist Nina Lakhani quotes Jenny Ramona Herrera Álvarez, a community spokeswoman in Triunfo de la Cruz: “We are under constant threat by those who want our land and natural resources.”  

 

 

E- Sample letter you can send to your US representative and US senators

Please email or call you Congressional reps and senators, urging them to contact the State Department and echo the call that is in that letter (July 30) from congressional leaders. A script is pasted below.  Find your congressperson and senators at https://www.house.gov/ and  https://www.senate.gov/ . If you have trouble with calls to their D.C. offices because no one is there, you can try their home district offices (see their website).  

Click here to send your message to Congress now, or use the sample below to write your own letter.

 Dear Representative ___/Senator____:

As your constituent, I am asking you to call the State Department and U.S. Embassy in Tegucigalpa, Honduras about the abduction and forced disappearance of five men from the Garífuna community of Triunfo de la Cruz: Milton Joel Martínez Álvarez, Suami Aparicio Mejía García, Gerardo Misael Trochez Calix,  Alber Sentana Thomas, and Snider Centeno   

I am aware that some US House members ( including the chair of House Foreign Affairs, and  chair and vice-chair of the  Western Hemisphere Subcommittee ) have already contacted Secretary of State Pompeo. We  need you to echo their urgent call to pressure the Honduran government to find these men and to end the pattern of impunity for human rights in their country. I am connected with the InterReligious Task Force in Cleveland, a member of the Honduras Solidarity Network, which has already alerted Honduran officials about the need to immediately investigate this incident and return these men to their communities unharmed, but too much time has passed  without result, and I am gravely concerned about their safety.

On the morning of Saturday, July 18 at approximately 6 am, these men were kidnapped and disappeared by a group of men wearing bullet proof vests and believed to be police. The men's vests had police investigative unit insignia (DPI by its Spanish acronym) on them, although the men arrived in unmarked cars. 

Snider Centeno is the president of the elected community council in Triunfo de la Cruz. He and his community won a case heard in the Inter-American Court on Human Rights in 2015 against the Honduran state for property rights violations and failure to consult the Afro-indigenous community about tourism developments on their land. However, the Honduran state has not respected the ruling and continues to encroach on Garifuna ancestral lands, to which the Garifuna have title, for the purpose of developing beachfront properties for tourists, including the lands belonging to Triunfo de la Cruz. The community has continued to vocally oppose the Honduran state’s illegal allocation of their lands to development corporations without consultation of the community. We are concerned that the disappearance of this Garifuna leader is in retaliation for this opposition.

Snider Centeno, Aparicio Mejía García and Milton Joel Martínez Álvarez are members of the Black Fraternal Organization of Honduras (OFRANEH), the Garífuna organization working to protect Garífuna economic, social and cultural rights. OFRANEH has been involved in legal suits and non-violent protests against the Honduran state for its violation of Garifuna rights. We believe they may also have been disappeared because of their membership in OFRANEH. 

Since the kidnappings, Honduran police have harassed the communities protesting the disappearances and in Triunfo de la Cruz at least one vehicle with unidentified armed men was seen last night driving circulating in town which is an act of intimidation. 

On May 7, 2020, the State Department certified Honduras on its efforts to providing effective and accountable law enforcement and security for its citizens among other human rights-related issues. I have serious doubts about these efforts. This particular incident, one among many other attacks, kidnappings, and assassinations carried out against civilians  by Honduran security forces, highlights the continuing insecurity faced by individuals expressing opposition to the government and land defenders in Honduras.

Please communicate with utmost urgency to the State Department and Embassy that they must urge Honduran officials to find these men and return them to their community. Time is of the essence—many of those who “disappear” in Honduras are later found dead.

Sincerely, 

 Click here to send your message now. 

F- More information

https://twitter.com/ofraneh (Black Fraternal Organization of Honduras)

https://www.facebook.com/HondurasSolidarityNetwork

G – Click here to send letters to officials in Honduras

August 25, 2020 to September 25, 2020: Support the solidarity economy. Fair Trade food products available from IRTF.
Mon-Fri 9-3 or by other arrangement
IRTF, 3606 Bridge Ave., Cleveland OH 44113

 (See product list and pricing below. Pick-up or home delivery.)

Please share the Facebook event for this fair trade sale . 

Support the solidarity economy. Fair Trade food products available from IRTF.

Support the solidarity economy. Get your fair trade coffee, chocolate, baking cocoa, and tea from IRTF this spring! Pick-up or home delivery!

Each year, IRTF provides tens of thousands of dollars in much needed income to fair trade cooperatives in Mexico, Central America, and Colombia. For more than three decades, IRTF has examined and challenged the current system of global capitalism dominated by big corporations, which exploits people and the planet. We are linked across the globe with small growers and producers—as well as authentic fair trade companies and nonprofits—in building an economy based on solidarity, putting people over profits. Another world is both possible and necessary; let’s build it together. Support authentic fair trade.

Fair trade is about more than just paying a fair wage. It means that trading partnerships are based on reciprocal benefits and mutual respect; that prices paid to producers reflect the work they do; that workers have the right to organize; that national health, safety, and wage laws are enforced; and that products are environmentally sustainable and conserve natural resources. In all, there are nine principles of fair trade. Fair price is only one of them. Read the Principles of Fair Trade here.

Read more at the bottom of this post about 1- fair trade certification, 2- some differences between fair trade and ethical trade/direct trade, and 3- how to shop fair trade in Ohio. Thank you for supporting the solidarity economy.

 

Equal Exchange and IRTF = Partners in Fair Trade

Why Equal Exchange?

Equal Exchange was founded in 1986 as a 100% fair trade worker-owned cooperative. Many other big commercial coffee roasters or retailers are involved in fair trade simply as a niche item for just one of their many product lines; and that’s as far as it goes.  For companies who are fully committed to fair trade, like Equal Exchange (the first fair trade coffee company in the US) it’s about transforming the food system. Price is only a part of it. It is mostly about relationship and mutual commitment to each other. Look for products that are 100% fair trade. If only 5-10% of a company’s product line is fair trade, you should question their commitment to justice for the workers who grow, produce, and process the product.

Read about Equal Exchange’s farmer partners across the globe here.

 

 

PURCHASE EQUAL EXCHANGE FAIR TRADE PRODUCTS from IRTF this spring.

To make a purchase, email your order to OhioFairTrade@irtfcleveland.org. Arrange for pick-up or home-delivery. Pay upon pick-up or delivery. Details at the bottom of this product list.

 

 

CHOCOLATE

Vegan Chocolate bars (listed in order of cacao %) $4 each

92% Total Eclipse

88% Extreme Dark

80% Panama Dark

67% Mint Crunch

65% Orange Infused

55% Lemon Ginger with Black Pepper

55% Toasted Almond

55% Coconut Milk

 

Milk Chocolate bars $4 each

43% Caramel Crunch with Sea Salt

 

Mini Chocolates $5

pack of 25 minis (milk or dark)

 

Chocolate Chips $5

10oz bag of semi-sweet

 

Baking cocoa $7

8oz can of 100% cacao (cocoa powder) from the Dominican Republic

 

Hot cocoa mix $7

12 oz can

regular – with non-fat milk powder and pure cane sugar

spicy – enhanced with vanilla, cayenne, cinnamon

 

FAIR FOODS

Olive Oil $15

17oz bottle, produced by Al Zawyeh cooperative on the West Bank

 

Dried Mango $6

5oz bag, produced by Gebana Afrique, an association of 17 rural cooperatives in Burkina Faso

 

TEA

$5 (box of 20 tea bags—all organic)

Tea that is grown by small-scale farmers is revolutionary in an industry dominated by large plantations. Equal Exchange partners with small growers in India, South Africa and Sri Lanka to build this alternative supply chain.

 

Black Tea

Black, Chai, Darjeeling, Earl Grey, English Breakfast, Decaf English Breakfast, Irish Breakfast

 

Green Tea

Green, Green with  Ginger, Jasmine Green, Mint Green

 

Herbal – all are caffeine free

Chamomile, Ginger, Peppermint, Rooibos (red bush), Rooibos Chai, Vanilla Rooibos

 

COFFEE

$9 – 12oz package of ground or whole bean

$10 – 12oz package of organic decaf

$52 – 5lb bag of whole bean (available: Breakfast Blend or French Roast)

 

Coffees listed in order of light roast to dark:

Toffee Caramel (light)

Café Salvador (light)

Breakfast Blend (organic) (med)

Love Buzz (organic) (med)

French Roast (organic) (dark)

 

 

COFFEE SERVERS

Stainless steel coffee server (thermos/carafe). $33

Sup-R-Serv by Update International. This stainless steel double walled carafe with an unbreakable liner is vacuum sealed, so it will keep liquids hot or cold for hours. Press button top for easy pouring. 64 oz capacity

 

Glass coffee carafe. $12

Designed for a Bunn burner coffee maker. Branded with Equal Exchange: Small Farmer, Big Change. This is a perfect gift for the kitchen at your place of worship or employment or school. Produced by Duran Schott glass company in Munich, Germany. 12-cup capacity.

 

 

BOOKS

The History of Authentic Fair Trade, by Phyllis Robinson and Nicholas Reid. Illustrations by Vendela Larsson. $7

Graphic novel style. Paperback. 40 pages

 

A Cafecito Story, by Julia Alvarez . Illustrations are woodcuts by Belkis Ramírez. $14

Hardback. 58 pages.

Based on her experience trying to reclaim a small coffee farm in her native Dominican Republic, A Cafecito Story is a poetic, modern fable about human beings at their best. The challenge of producing coffee is a remarkable test of our ability to live more sustainably, caring for the land, growers, and consumers in an enlightened and just way. Written with Julia Alvarez's deft touch, this is a story that stimulates while it comforts, waking the mind and warming the soul like the first cup of morning coffee. Indeed, this story is best read with a strong cup of organic, shade-grown, fresh-brewed coffee.

 

PICK-UP or HOME DELIVERY

Pick up your order at IRTF, Monday-Thursday, 9am-4pm, or by other appointment. Please confirm your pick-up time before you show up (because the building is generally locked). Payment: cash, check, credit card.

Home delivery: available within a few miles of the office. Inquire.

 

IRTF is located on the campus of St Patrick Church, 3606 Bridge Ave, Cleveland 44113, at the corner of  W. 38th St. Just one block north of Lorain Ave. Parking right in front of the building. Questions? Call 216.961.0003 M-Th, 9-4.

 

---------------

 

EDUCATION CORNER

Learn more about fair trade.

1- Fair Trade Standards & Certification

2- Differences between Fair Trade and Ethical/Direct Trade

3- How to Shop Fair Trade in Ohio

 

 

1- FAIR TRADE STANDARDS & CERTIFICATION

Standards and Certification: Agricultural Products v. Handmade Products

There are two separate sets of standards. Why? Because an agricultural product (a banana, a coffee bean, a cocoa bean, etc.) is easier to trace from where it was produced to where it was processed to where it ended up on your grocer’s shelf. Handmade products have component parts (cotton, thread, dyes, metals, zippers) that are harder to trace.

 

Agricultural Products

Here is a list of standards to certify that the product is fair trade: http://fairtradeamerica.org/Resources%20Library/Standards

If an agricultural product is truly fair trade, it will ,likely carry a certification label: https://fairworldproject.org/validation-programs/ . This means they open their agricultural fields and processing centers to independent third party inspectors who investigate and make a report and recommendation to the certifying agency: Fair Trade Labeling Organization (FLO), Fair Trade USA, or IMO/Fair for Life.

If an agricultural product claims to be fair trade and does not have certification, you would need to investigate them. You could start by asking the folks at FairTradeAmerica.org if they know anything about the company or their claims of being fair trade.

 

Handmade Products

There is no certification for handmade products (with few exceptions, such as Maggie’s Organics based in Michigan). However, most fair trade resale operations in the US belong to the Fair Trade Federation. The Fair Trade Federation makes sure that the products they sell meet fair trade standards (i.e., the Principles of Fair Trade). If the resale operation does not belong to the Fair Trade Federation, you need to investigate them individually with a set of questions to vet them to see if they are legitimately fair trade. Contact OhioFairTrade@irtfcleveland.org  if you need a set of those questions.

 

 

2- DIFFERENCES BETWEEN FAIR TRADE & ETHICAL/DIRECT TRADE

Consumers can educate themselves about the benefits of fair trade and the benefits of other labeling systems. Here are some examples: Ethical Trade, Direct Trade, Whole Trade, Rainforest Alliance. Consumers should compare and contrast the claims of each of the labeling systems.

Direct Trade is one system that has gained popularity over the past several years. Direct Trade claims that they benefit farmers more than Fair Trade does because they know the farmer and their family, they visit, they’ve met the workers, etc.

Here is a criticism of Direct Trade: Direct Trade is a relationship between a distributor in the US (say, a coffee roaster) and a farmer in Latin America who has a privately-owned coffee plantation. This is significant. Even if the coffee roaster in the US is paying the farmer more than they were getting in the past—and even if they’re paying more than the fair trade price—the Direct Trade system is not doing anything to change the basic dominant/subordinate relationship between the farmer (plantation owner) and their workers. Direct Traders say things like, “But the farmworkers are paid more because we pay the farmers more and they pass that along in increased wages to their workers.” Maybe. Maybe not. It’s still up to the discretion of the farmer who is the plantation owner, and, however nice a person they might be, has control over the wages and working conditions of the workers on the plantation.

Authentic fair trade is different. Authentic fair trade started as a way to support farmer-owned cooperatives and give them a way into the market. A cooperative is a different model of ownership. It is not the dominant/subordinate relationship of the private owner/workers. A cooperative is a jointly-owned business. It might have 10 farmer-owners, it might have 500 in a cooperative of producers.  The significant thing about the cooperative is that it is democratically run. The members elect their leadership; they have a say-so in their working hours and conditions; they have a say-so in how much each farmer gets paid and how to spend the “social premium.” (The social premium is an amount, usually around 15-cents per pound, paid by buyers like Equal Exchange to the farm cooperative above the agreed upon price for the coffee beans. The farmer-owners of the cooperative decide collectively how to spend the extra social premium on improvements in their community, like housing, education, nutrition, gender equity programs, etc.)

Besides the democratic nature of the cooperative, there are many other social, economic, and political benefits to having cooperatives in a country. For instance, right now in Central America, campesinos are facing huge threats of forced displacement and environmental destruction because of large private corporations and their conspirators in corrupt governments who prefer catering to corporate greed over the well-being of the people. Historically, cooperatives have led social movements for land justice, environmental justice, and democracy and in their countries.

 

Here is a good example from Guatemala: In 2006, the government of Guatemala was getting ready to ratify the US-Central America Free Trade Agreement (CAFTA). Small farmers knew this would be bad for them and good for multinational food corporations. How did they show their disapproval? The farmers—mostly members of cooperatives across the country—moved onto large government tracts of land and occupied them in protest. They shut down major highways. They encircled the Congress building. They kept the protest movement alive and showed that the majority of the people in Guatemala were against this free trade scheme. Did they prevail? No. The government went ahead and followed pressure from the US to enter into CAFTA. But if it weren’t for the strong cooperative movement, this strong showing of disapproval—and the international solidarity it generated—would not have happened.

 

Another example from Colombia in 2019:  People in Colombia (both in the cities and in the rural zones) have been dissatisfied with their government’s slow pace of implementing the 2016 Peace Accords that were meant to end 50 years of civil war in their country. In November and December of 2019, large scale protests were organized to pressure their president to do much more to promote and protect the peace process, protect the environment, and protect human rights. Especially in the rural areas, farmer-owned cooperatives and farm unions were instrumental in organizing masses of people to join these protests. Over 200,000 marched the first day in Bogotá. Broad based coalitions came together promoting a variety of justice issues. One issue key to people in the rural areas is the provision in the Peace Accords to enroll farmers in a program to substitute illegal crops (i.e., coca grown for cocaine) with legal ones (food products).  Many of the farmers who are leading this initiative in their communities are being assassinated. Why? Because the criminal groups that make money from the drug trade don’t want the farmers to stop growing coca, the main ingredient for cocaine. Farmers are demanding more protection from their government. The cooperative movement across Colombia (the land mass in Colombia is mostly countryside) is vital to the broader social movement for justice and peace in Colombia.

In sum: When companies sell fair trade products that are not produced by farmer-owned cooperatives but are produced by privately-owned farms instead, they are weakening the cooperative model. This is a detriment to both economic justice and to political justice.  Cooperatives have historically played significant roles in broader justice movements in their countries. Fewer cooperatives means less economic justice and fewer civil/political rights.

 

3- HOW TO SHOP FAIR TRADE IN OHIO

A- See this link on OhioFairTrade.com:

https://ohiofairtrade.com/shop-fair-trade/how-to-shop-fair-trade/

 

B- See this link for stores in Ohio that sells products, all of which are fair trade products

https://ohiofairtrade.com/shop-fair-trade/ohio-fair-trade-stores/

 

C- See this link for stores in Ohio (mostly grocery) that sell products that are fair trade or contain fair trade ingredients

https://ohiofairtrade.com/shop-fair-trade/companies-that-use-fair-trade-ingredients/

 

D- If there is a particular product you are looking for, you can go to FairTradeCertified.org and research it and ask the company if their product is available in your area.

 

Learn more about fair trade at www.OhioFairTrade.com

 

September 21, 2020: We Hold Up Half the Sky: Feminist Voices Against Militarism
7:00 pm - 8:30pm Eastern Time

Please share the Facebook event: https://www.facebook.com/events/2771316469792756/

Hear from Anti-Militarist Feminist Voices on this

International Day of Peace

The increasing push for global militarization directly impacts billions of women and gender nonconforming folks around the world each day. These voices, experiences and perspectives are often silenced when approaching solutions to this crisis. Hear about how militarism is experienced and about the stories of resistance to violence from several communities we work alongside.

Christian Peacemaker Teams (CPT) and the InterReligious Task Force on Central America & Colombia (IRTF) are partnering to bring several powerful voices together for a live webinar conversation on anti-militarism. 

 

Brittany DeBarros

Organizing Director of About Face (Veterans Against War)

 

Rosa Moiwend

West Papuan activist, researcher, human rights defender

 

Camila Rodríguez

Convergencia de Saberes y Acción Territorial en Colombia

 

Celeste Smith

Executive Director of Skywoman’s Garden and Project Lead of Ga Gitigemi Gamik. Celeste is from the Wolf Clan and is Oneida/Mohawk from Six Nations of the Grand River Territory

 

Chrissy Stonebraker-Martínez

Co-Coordinator of the InterReligious Task Force on Central America and Colombia in Cleveland, Ohio

 

Register at https://cptaction.org/

 

Memory & Resistance: 40 years. Inspired by the martyrdom of Jean Donovan and Sister Dorothy Kazel in El Salvador in 1980, we uphold the legacy of these remarkable women and, in their spirit of solidarity, uplift the struggles of all oppressed peoples. Over the course of the next year, the Memory & Resistance Coalition will highlight, celebrate, and commemorate our collective legacies of resistance  through an art exhibition, webinars, expert panels, spoken word and musical performances, public discussions, book clubs, and more.

October 14, 2020: Food Action Forum - Make Our Food System Fair!
7-8pm
Zoom meeting via internet

 

Wednesdays: Oct 14, Nov 11, Dec 9 – Please join us!

If the registration link is not listed here, email eeactionforum@equalexchange.coop to ask for it. Once registered, you will receive the link for this particular zoom meeting.

What are the Food Action Forum monthly meetings? (aka Citizen-Consumer Food Movement)

Alternative Trade Organizations (such as Equal Exchange) have foundational influence in the broader fair trade movement but have become isolated from even their most natural allies including coops, citizen movements, community economic organizations, unions, and non-governmental organizations (NGOs). The monthly Food Action Forum meetings allow all of us to connect, build community, and have space to push our campaigns forward and engage in actions out in our local communities.  Join us as we work together to build a democratic brand that connects small farmers in the Global South to consumers in the Global North.

For any questions, please reach out to eeactionforum@equalexchange.coop --Frankie, Danielle, Em 

 

*What are ATOs? Alternative Trade Organizations (ATOs) are at risk

Equal Exchange was founded in 1986 as an alternative trade organization (ATO) with the mission of connecting US consumers and small marginalized farmers from the global south from countries like Nicaragua, Peru, or India.  The vitality (and survivability) of ATOs is at risk because of increasing isolation from even their most natural allies  like food co-ops. Here are some other reasons: 

1- Fair-Washing: Fair Trade is being stripped of its original meaning

The Fair Trade idea may have won successes in the last 10 years, but those successes have been limited. And in the process of gaining recognition and support, control has been wrested from small farmers and turned into a marketing attribute at the service of northern companies; it has been commodified and stripped of all real meaning. While some northern ATOs are still here and hundreds of farmer groups in the Global South hang on, "Fair Trade” as envisioned 30 years ago, is no longer recognizable.

 

2- Corporate Control: Our food system is being controlled by large corporations

In the wider food system, corporations control everything from seeds to supply and prices, while relentlessly chipping away at the regulations that inform and protect consumers. They fight feverishly to prevent us from knowing if GMOs are present in our food. They continue to promote production methods that hasten the warming of the planet—a present-day threat to millions of small farmers and others around the world. And, corporations count on consumers remaining unorganized to maintain the status quo.   

 

What We Can Do Together

We need active consumer involvement to make a difference

We now know that we cannot possibly succeed in our goal to transform the food system without the active, deep and committed participation of citizen-consumers like you. An authentic Fair Trade system requires democratic organizing of producers in the South, worker democracy for businesses in the North, and active consumer involvement in the North. 

What Are We Building?

We are taking a powerful, new step in building a democratic brand that connects small farmers in the South to consumers in the North. We believe that in order to be successful in realizing the original Fair Trade vision, we need to deepen involvement and participation in our model. In doing this, we go back to the best that Alternative Trade has always been about: innovation, global solidarity, social imagining and learning, and economic justice. This will be a long, slow process and a great challenge. We need your buying support, your investing support, and your political support. 

Please join us in building this dream. We invite you to help us shape the Equal Exchange Action Forum. 

 About Equal Exchange, a work-owned cooperative:

 This invitation to join the Food Action Forum comes from Equal Exchange, an Alternative Trade Organization (ATO) and the first fair trade coffee company in the US, which is working to build a democratic brand that connects small farmers in the Global South to consumers in the Global North. IRTF in Cleveland first introduced NE Ohioans to Equal Exchange coffee in the mid-1990s. Several faith congregations began selling Equal Exchange as an act of solidarity and justice. Heinen’s became the first grocer chain to sell Equal Exchange in all its stores in the US. IRTF and Equal Exchange have been close partners and friends ever since.

Here are some ways to get involved:

-Educate yourself. See resources on the food system, fair trade coffee, coffee producing in selected Latin American countries, sustainable farming, cooperatives, solidarity economy

-Join the Behind the Barcodes campaign

-Urge Congress to pass the Food Anti-Trust Review Act

-Become a member of the Food Action Forum

-Connect with like-minded folks at monthly Fair Trade Meet-Ups. See more at http://ohiofairtrade.com/

 

November 11, 2020: Food Action Forum - Make Our Food System Fair!
7-8pm
Zoom meeting via internet

 

Wednesdays: Oct 14, Nov 11, Dec 9 – Please join us!

If the registration link is not listed here, email eeactionforum@equalexchange.coop to ask for it. Once registered, you will receive the link for this particular zoom meeting.

What are the Food Action Forum monthly meetings? (aka Citizen-Consumer Food Movement)

Alternative Trade Organizations (such as Equal Exchange) have foundational influence in the broader fair trade movement but have become isolated from even their most natural allies including coops, citizen movements, community economic organizations, unions, and non-governmental organizations (NGOs). The monthly Food Action Forum meetings allow all of us to connect, build community, and have space to push our campaigns forward and engage in actions out in our local communities.  Join us as we work together to build a democratic brand that connects small farmers in the Global South to consumers in the Global North.

For any questions, please reach out to eeactionforum@equalexchange.coop --Frankie, Danielle, Em 

 

*What are ATOs? Alternative Trade Organizations (ATOs) are at risk

Equal Exchange was founded in 1986 as an alternative trade organization (ATO) with the mission of connecting US consumers and small marginalized farmers from the global south from countries like Nicaragua, Peru, or India.  The vitality (and survivability) of ATOs is at risk because of increasing isolation from even their most natural allies  like food co-ops. Here are some other reasons: 

1- Fair-Washing: Fair Trade is being stripped of its original meaning

The Fair Trade idea may have won successes in the last 10 years, but those successes have been limited. And in the process of gaining recognition and support, control has been wrested from small farmers and turned into a marketing attribute at the service of northern companies; it has been commodified and stripped of all real meaning. While some northern ATOs are still here and hundreds of farmer groups in the Global South hang on, "Fair Trade” as envisioned 30 years ago, is no longer recognizable.

 

2- Corporate Control: Our food system is being controlled by large corporations

In the wider food system, corporations control everything from seeds to supply and prices, while relentlessly chipping away at the regulations that inform and protect consumers. They fight feverishly to prevent us from knowing if GMOs are present in our food. They continue to promote production methods that hasten the warming of the planet—a present-day threat to millions of small farmers and others around the world. And, corporations count on consumers remaining unorganized to maintain the status quo.   

 

What We Can Do Together

We need active consumer involvement to make a difference

We now know that we cannot possibly succeed in our goal to transform the food system without the active, deep and committed participation of citizen-consumers like you. An authentic Fair Trade system requires democratic organizing of producers in the South, worker democracy for businesses in the North, and active consumer involvement in the North. 

What Are We Building?

We are taking a powerful, new step in building a democratic brand that connects small farmers in the South to consumers in the North. We believe that in order to be successful in realizing the original Fair Trade vision, we need to deepen involvement and participation in our model. In doing this, we go back to the best that Alternative Trade has always been about: innovation, global solidarity, social imagining and learning, and economic justice. This will be a long, slow process and a great challenge. We need your buying support, your investing support, and your political support. 

Please join us in building this dream. We invite you to help us shape the Equal Exchange Action Forum. 

 About Equal Exchange, a work-owned cooperative:

 This invitation to join the Food Action Forum comes from Equal Exchange, an Alternative Trade Organization (ATO) and the first fair trade coffee company in the US, which is working to build a democratic brand that connects small farmers in the Global South to consumers in the Global North. IRTF in Cleveland first introduced NE Ohioans to Equal Exchange coffee in the mid-1990s. Several faith congregations began selling Equal Exchange as an act of solidarity and justice. Heinen’s became the first grocer chain to sell Equal Exchange in all its stores in the US. IRTF and Equal Exchange have been close partners and friends ever since.

Here are some ways to get involved:

-Educate yourself. See resources on the food system, fair trade coffee, coffee producing in selected Latin American countries, sustainable farming, cooperatives, solidarity economy

-Join the Behind the Barcodes campaign

-Urge Congress to pass the Food Anti-Trust Review Act

-Become a member of the Food Action Forum

-Connect with like-minded folks at monthly Fair Trade Meet-Ups. See more at http://ohiofairtrade.com/

 

December 9, 2020: Food Action Forum - Make Our Food System Fair!
7-8pm
Zoom meeting via internet

 

Wednesdays: Oct 14, Nov 11, Dec 9 – Please join us!

If the registration link is not listed here, email eeactionforum@equalexchange.coop to ask for it. Once registered, you will receive the link for this particular zoom meeting.

What are the Food Action Forum monthly meetings? (aka Citizen-Consumer Food Movement)

Alternative Trade Organizations (such as Equal Exchange) have foundational influence in the broader fair trade movement but have become isolated from even their most natural allies including coops, citizen movements, community economic organizations, unions, and non-governmental organizations (NGOs). The monthly Food Action Forum meetings allow all of us to connect, build community, and have space to push our campaigns forward and engage in actions out in our local communities.  Join us as we work together to build a democratic brand that connects small farmers in the Global South to consumers in the Global North.

For any questions, please reach out to eeactionforum@equalexchange.coop --Frankie, Danielle, Em 

 

*What are ATOs? Alternative Trade Organizations (ATOs) are at risk

Equal Exchange was founded in 1986 as an alternative trade organization (ATO) with the mission of connecting US consumers and small marginalized farmers from the global south from countries like Nicaragua, Peru, or India.  The vitality (and survivability) of ATOs is at risk because of increasing isolation from even their most natural allies  like food co-ops. Here are some other reasons: 

1- Fair-Washing: Fair Trade is being stripped of its original meaning

The Fair Trade idea may have won successes in the last 10 years, but those successes have been limited. And in the process of gaining recognition and support, control has been wrested from small farmers and turned into a marketing attribute at the service of northern companies; it has been commodified and stripped of all real meaning. While some northern ATOs are still here and hundreds of farmer groups in the Global South hang on, "Fair Trade” as envisioned 30 years ago, is no longer recognizable.

 

2- Corporate Control: Our food system is being controlled by large corporations

In the wider food system, corporations control everything from seeds to supply and prices, while relentlessly chipping away at the regulations that inform and protect consumers. They fight feverishly to prevent us from knowing if GMOs are present in our food. They continue to promote production methods that hasten the warming of the planet—a present-day threat to millions of small farmers and others around the world. And, corporations count on consumers remaining unorganized to maintain the status quo.   

 

What We Can Do Together

We need active consumer involvement to make a difference

We now know that we cannot possibly succeed in our goal to transform the food system without the active, deep and committed participation of citizen-consumers like you. An authentic Fair Trade system requires democratic organizing of producers in the South, worker democracy for businesses in the North, and active consumer involvement in the North. 

What Are We Building?

We are taking a powerful, new step in building a democratic brand that connects small farmers in the South to consumers in the North. We believe that in order to be successful in realizing the original Fair Trade vision, we need to deepen involvement and participation in our model. In doing this, we go back to the best that Alternative Trade has always been about: innovation, global solidarity, social imagining and learning, and economic justice. This will be a long, slow process and a great challenge. We need your buying support, your investing support, and your political support. 

Please join us in building this dream. We invite you to help us shape the Equal Exchange Action Forum. 

 About Equal Exchange, a work-owned cooperative:

 This invitation to join the Food Action Forum comes from Equal Exchange, an Alternative Trade Organization (ATO) and the first fair trade coffee company in the US, which is working to build a democratic brand that connects small farmers in the Global South to consumers in the Global North. IRTF in Cleveland first introduced NE Ohioans to Equal Exchange coffee in the mid-1990s. Several faith congregations began selling Equal Exchange as an act of solidarity and justice. Heinen’s became the first grocer chain to sell Equal Exchange in all its stores in the US. IRTF and Equal Exchange have been close partners and friends ever since.

Here are some ways to get involved:

-Educate yourself. See resources on the food system, fair trade coffee, coffee producing in selected Latin American countries, sustainable farming, cooperatives, solidarity economy

-Join the Behind the Barcodes campaign

-Urge Congress to pass the Food Anti-Trust Review Act

-Become a member of the Food Action Forum

-Connect with like-minded folks at monthly Fair Trade Meet-Ups. See more at http://ohiofairtrade.com/