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Nicaragua: News & Updates

Nicaragua was ruled by the Somoza dictatorship, backed by the US, for 30 years. After the Sandinista Revolution took control in 1979, the US assembled former Somoza National Guardsmen into a counterrevolutionary force that, for the next decade,  terrorized the civilian population in an attempt to weaken popular support for the Sandinistas. The  “contra war”  left 30,000 people dead and forced more than 100,000 to seek refuge in the US.

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News Article
Despite the new tax increases, Nicaragua has not seen a repeat of last year’s mass protests. And it seems unlikely to, since Ortega, a 73-year-old ex-guerrilla who was first president from 1985 to 1990, forcefully quashed the challenge to his power, including effectively outlawing opposition demonstrations since September....“We are not in the streets because there is a state of terror in Nicaragua, because there are police and shock troops that arrest you and beat you,” said Ana Margarita Vijil, leader of the dissident Sandinista Renewal Movement, which the government accuses of promoting a “terrorist coup.”
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Mexico agrees to mediate as veteran rebel leader Daniel Ortega faces biggest challenge: possible expulsion of Nicaragua from the Organization of American States (OAS).
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Unanimous approval of a de facto economic embargo on Nicaragua. After defeating a violent US-backed coup attempt, Nicaragua’s elected government faces the NICA Act. The bill aims to force the Sandinistas from power by ratcheting up economic despair.
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news coverage of the crisis in Nicaragua has sought to simplify a complex reality. The prevailing coverage lays the blame for the conflict on Nicaraguan President Daniel Ortega and presents a politically narrow and historically shallow context. As a result, the message implicit and sometimes explicit in the coverage—that Ortega is the villain and his departure from office would end the conflict or solve the problems underlying the crisis—is distorted and misleading.
News Article
Since the May 17-21 working visit to Nicaragua, the IACHR (Inter-American Commission on Human Rights) has adopted nine resolutions requesting precautionary measures to protect the lives and personal integrity of 64 people on various issues, including their families. Among the beneficiaries are student leaders, human rights defenders, journalists, relatives of victims, survivors of violence, priests, and persons who have provided assistance to injured people.
News Article
The US has been party to the favorable opinions given by all the main international bodies on the way Nicaragua uses the finance that is provided, with no suggestions of money being diverted for other uses or used corruptly. Its action [passage of the NICA Act] will therefore be seen as hypocritical, and contrary to the evidence gathered by bodies of which it is an influential member.
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Nicaragua's achievements in education, healthcare, energy, and lowering poverty can be seen in contrast to the ‘northern triangle’ countries of Honduras, Guatemala and El Salvador. Nicaragua produces only a very small proportion of the thousands of undocumented migrants who travel north to Mexico and the US.

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